Making Yourself Miserable — Scripture Impressions and Digressions

This morning I preached on the "second" Jacob and Esau story -- the deception by Rebekah and Jacob which ultimately resulted in Jacob, and not Esau, receiving their father Isaac's blessing. There were two points from the message that I've been asked to share. The first comes from an article I read recently by a … Continue reading Making Yourself Miserable — Scripture Impressions and Digressions

Charlemagne was great, but his son Louis the Pious may have been even better (Hangin’ with the Carolingians part 4)

[This is part four and the final selection of my series of articles entitled: "Hangin' with the Carolingians." The Carolingian dynasty, which encompassed nearly two centuries (AD 686-c.900), is a fascinating era. To this point, the articles have discussed the crowning of Charlemagne, the Holy Roman Empire, and the Venerable Bede's take on Lent. In … Continue reading Charlemagne was great, but his son Louis the Pious may have been even better (Hangin’ with the Carolingians part 4)

Charlemagne and the Holy Roman Empire (Hangin’ with the Carolingians part 2)

[This is part two of my series of articles entitled: "Hangin' with the Carolingians." The Carolingian dynasty, which encompassed nearly two centuries (AD 686-840), is a fascinating era. The series began with the high point of the period, the crowning of Charlemagne as Emperor of the Holy Roman Empire on Christmas Day, AD 800. Part … Continue reading Charlemagne and the Holy Roman Empire (Hangin’ with the Carolingians part 2)

A Reluctant Icon: Charlemagne (Hangin’ with the Carolingians part 1)

[In the next few weeks, I will be publishing a series of articles under the heading: "Hangin' with the Carolingians." The Carolingian dynasty, which encompassed nearly two centuries (AD 686-840), is a fascinating era. This series will begin with a discussion on the high point of the period, the crowning of Charlemagne as Emperor of … Continue reading A Reluctant Icon: Charlemagne (Hangin’ with the Carolingians part 1)

John Calvin and why the Church should be ashamed

The final installment in my series on the biblical command to care for the poor is about a system that is broken. If anyone in church history who is most associated with a system, it would have to be John Calvin (AD 1509-1564). Calvin remains one of the most influential theologians since St. Augustine. Tragically, … Continue reading John Calvin and why the Church should be ashamed

Katherine von Bora and the Martin Luther’s Family Dinner Table

The men of the Reformation are almost household names in Church History: Luther. Calvin. Zwingli. Knox. As with every era of history, several women played important roles during this period of rebirth in the Church. History records the venerable lives of several important women of this era, most of whom had their roots in the … Continue reading Katherine von Bora and the Martin Luther’s Family Dinner Table