A Restorative Work of Art for Easter

In preparation for Palm Sunday, I shared A Devastating Work of Art for Holy Week. The painting I focused on is the central panel of the Isenheim Altarpiece, painted by Matthias Grunewald in France, in the year 1515. Grunewald was commissioned to depict Jesus in a way that was uniquely relatable to the patients of Isenheim, … Continue reading A Restorative Work of Art for Easter

A Devastating Work of Art for Holy Week

The unexpected always seems to happen when you least expect it. Deep, huh? There I was, slogging (and whining)¬†through my civic duty, when I met a new friend who just happened to be a curator for my favorite museum in Tulsa. I was fortunate to not only make a new art acquaintance, but also one … Continue reading A Devastating Work of Art for Holy Week

It’s OK to Disagree with Others (but there is a right way to do it) – from Philip Spener c. 1675

I was asked by a friend recently, "How do we possibly argue for biblical truth with all of the contentious issues in our world today?" The answer I gave to my friend has not changed: "However we do it, we must do it with humility." We live in a culture that thrives on inflated opinions, … Continue reading It’s OK to Disagree with Others (but there is a right way to do it) – from Philip Spener c. 1675

John Calvin and why the Church should be ashamed

The final installment in my series on the biblical command to care for the poor is about a system that is broken. If anyone in church history who is most associated with a system, it would have to be John Calvin (AD 1509-1564). Calvin remains one of the most influential theologians since St. Augustine. Tragically, … Continue reading John Calvin and why the Church should be ashamed

Katherine von Bora and the Martin Luther’s Family Dinner Table

The men of the Reformation are almost household names in Church History: Luther. Calvin. Zwingli. Knox. As with every era of history, several women played important roles during this period of rebirth in the Church. History records the venerable lives of several important women of this era, most of whom had their roots in the … Continue reading Katherine von Bora and the Martin Luther’s Family Dinner Table

The mighty fortress of Martin Luther’s “A Mighty Fortress is Our God”

In church this past Sunday, we sang my favorite hymn: Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott by Martin Luther (1483-1546). In the English-speaking world, the hymn is better known as A Mighty Fortress is Our God. This song is often called the "the battle hymn" of the Reformation as it has been important to Lutherans … Continue reading The mighty fortress of Martin Luther’s “A Mighty Fortress is Our God”

The Original Mother Teresa and the Game of Chess

It would be hard to find an adult in the 21st century that has never heard of Mother Teresa. Our Mother Teresa of Calcutta (1910-1997) is nothing short of iconic in the Western and Eastern world. She remains an inspiration to Christians and non-Christians around the globe. Most people, however, know very little of the … Continue reading The Original Mother Teresa and the Game of Chess